Free* shipping

story

Scottish photographers Merlin Kafka and Alistair Horne explore the Faroe Islands and reveal the best ways to capture the dramatic coastline and rock formations of Denmark’s remote archipelago.

Spacing half

SS17 GuideToTheFaroeIslands Image2

Spacing half

HOW TO GET THERE

The Faroe Islands are a remote group of islands northwest of Scotland, between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic. Part of Denmark, they can be reached either by ferry or plane. Flights leave regularly from Edinburgh to the Island’s airport on Vágar, a short drive to the capital Tórshavn.

Spacing half

WHERE TO STAY

Driving from one end to the other takes an hour and a half at most so you can conveniently stay in Tórshavn, the islands’ capital. A town conveniently located in the south, Tórshavn also happens to be one of the main ports for ferries to the southern islands.

Spacing half

SS17 GuideToTheFaroeIslands Image3

Spacing half

WHAT TO PACK

If you’re used to the unpredictable nature of Scottish weather, that’s certainly a good starting point for your packing list. The Faroe Islands are even more unpredictable, so waterproof jackets, wellies and a good woollen jumper to resist the cold winds are essential. We found reliable waterproof footwear particularly important as many routes to the Faroese sights do not have clearly defined paths and include boggy terrain with the occasional river crossing.

Spacing half

SS17 GuideToTheFaroeIslands Image4

Spacing half

WHERE TO EXPLORE

Even though the islands are small, there are plenty of areas to hike and discover, most within close proximity to each other. We particularly enjoyed the route to Kallur Lighthouse on Kalsoy, an island in the northeast, with very dramatic coastlines and rock formations. We also hiked to the infamous view of the ‘lake above the ocean’ at Sørvágsvatn, which takes around an hour from the village of Miðvágur. Hiking above the village of Viðareiði, in the far north of the country, also had stunning views of the surrounding coastline and the tiny village.

Spacing half

WHAT TO CAPTURE

The island of Vágar has an abundance of areas to photograph, including the village of Bøur and the view over Sørvágsvatn. The waterfall at the village of Gásadalur is an incredible spectacle too. Finally, the island of Suðuroy was a pleasant surprise for us, with dramatic, unspoilt coastlines fit for a movie scene. Well worth a visit!

Spacing half

SS17 GuideToTheFaroeIslands Image5

Spacing half

OUR FAVOURITE IMAGE

The image that shows Ali walking on the grassy field in the foreground with the jagged cliffs of Kalsoy as the backdrop is be one of our favourites. The photograph expresses a clear sense of scale and will always be a reminder how raw and unforgiving the Faroe Islands are and what a memorable trip it was.

Spacing half

AN ENDURING MEMORY

The quietness and how the islands are not up to date with modern life in so many ways. There are few tourists right now, but I wouldn’t be surprised if that changes in the next few years. Hiking with no one else around to these beautiful views is rare nowadays, it was an amazing feeling. The local people are very friendly and happy to help: we met a few for some hikes and they were so passionate about their culture and the beautiful landscapes.

Spacing half

SS17 GuideToTheFaroeIslands Image6

Spacing half

Discover more from Merlin Kafka and Alistair Horne.

Close Video